This Week in Pictures… Sort Of (6/10)

It’s been a busy week for me, this last week of Age 27. Continue reading

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Cupcake Change Purse

I am just obsessed with cupcakes this week, apparently XD

While working on the project bag, I had the idea to make a tiny version of the project bag as a change purse–it came out just the way I wanted it to! The sequins took about two hours to sew on (longer than the time it took to make the actual bag…go figure)… but totally worth it.

I’m making some more for sale in my shop ❤

Here are some more pictures:

You can see the iridescence of the sequins in this pic 😀
I have about a lb of change in here… handles it like a champ!
.
I got my labels a while back… this is the first item to have one ❤

It’s highly unlikely I’ll be releasing a pattern for this because I don’t really feel like it atm.

Haven’t you guys gotten enough cupcake shit from me??!?? 😛

Cutie Cupcake Project Bag is Live!

I posted the pattern on Ravelry yesterday. Please note that this is still being tested, so if you have any comments, questions, or suggestions, please do not hesitate to contact me.

This is based off of my Cutie Cupcake ami, hence the name. It follows the same basic methods but

  • it’s bigger
  • it’s made seamlessly
  • it’s made from the bottom up
And, you know, it’s a bag 😉

Gauge is not important; size can be changed by changing hook size, or doing more/less repeats.

Any worsted weight will do to make this. If you feel adventurous/ambitious, a smaller hook size may be substituted. There will be notes about this in the pattern.

The pattern has a link to my FPDC tutorial + a photo tutorial for my version of surface crochet.

Please note that if you choose to line the bag, some basic sewing skills are required.

You are allowed to do whatever the hell you want with your FOs. All I ask for is credit for the pattern if you decide to sell your FOs. 😀

You can download it via Ravelry or here: Download Cutie Cupcake Project Bag – it’s free! 😀

Happy Hooking!

Creative Commons License
Cutie Cupcake Project Bag by Deena White is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Photo Tutorial: Front Post Double Crochet

I was going to include this in the Cutie Cupcake Bag pattern, but then I realized it would be like a zillion pages O__o

SO here it is! A photo tutorial to FPDC. I hope it helps 🙂

Front Post Double Crochet
 If you’re using this tut to help you with the Cutie Cupcake Project Bag, your piece should look like this at the beginning of row 8:
This is the beginning of row 8 with the ch 2 and dc done.

To make a FPDC, you’re going to yarn over and put your hook behind the dc on the previous row from right to left:
You put the hook through the space behind the dc of the previous row.
Make sure it’s completely behind and not through the stitch!
 Then you’re going to yarn over once more and pull the hook back to the right side:
Yarn over once more….
…pull it through.
So now you have three loops on your hook… looks familiar right? Yep, it’s just like a regular dc from this point. Yarn over, pull through the first two loops, then YO again through the remaining loops. That’s it! 
Ta-da! FPDC!
 From here in the pattern, you alternate as follows: dc then FPDC, etc.
Here are some more pictures:
Here’s an angled view of the FPDC. See the ridge it makes? 
First row of FPDC and dc completed.
The first row of FPDC ribbing might be the trickiest. When I first learned, I was increasing all over the place. Just make sure you’re not doing a FPDC in the same stitch you’re doing the regular dc in. The second and subsequent rows are easy peasy. You know where the FPDC goes just by feeling the fabric and looking at the ridges. You will FPDC in the previous FPDCs and dc in the previous dc. 
See what I mean?
 This is what the back of FPDC and dc ribbed fabric looks like:

I hope this tutorial helped! If you need more assistance, there are loads of videos online, or you may send me a message on Google Plus or pm me on Ravelry.

Happy Hooking!

Update for Cutie Cupcake!

I have fiiinally come up with a top for the Cutie Cupcake I am happy with. I have revised the .pdf and posted it on Ravelry.

Here are some updated pictures:

The ice cream in the pictures is an old pattern I found the notes to and updated in December. I sold a bunch of them at the Bryant park Holiday Market in NYC. They are so cute and so easy to make! I suppose y’all would want a pattern for it too huh? 😛
Speaking of patterns, I actually have two ami patterns (the ice cream and an Erlenmeyer flask), a hat, and two crocheted sock patterns that need typing up… I should get on that soon, huh? 
The big sister to Cutie Cupcake will be released soon!

Cupcake Project Bag

I made this bag for a swap on Google +. It was pretty easy to make and I loved the end result.  I took my Cutie Cupcake pattern and slightly tweaked it (I used a different hook size, and added a lil of this and a lil of that…) and voila!
It was pretty fun to make… and I want one for myself 😛
The above picture was taken by the lovely +Dianne Velazquez-Hunt.  (She is such a doll for letting me use her photos :D)  More pictures of the FO below 🙂
Photo by +Dianne Velazquez-Hunt 
Photo by +Dianne Velazquez-Hunt 

I’m thinking about writing up a pattern for it. Anyone interested? Leave a comment if you are and if enough people are interested I will happily replicate it and take notes this time! Also, please indicate if you’d like to test the finished pattern for me ❤

SSK, K2tog TBL… Same Difference… Right?

This is actually k2tog. SO what?? 😛

This is an expanded version of a post I shared on the Plus today.

As someone who is by default a combination knitter, I always though k2tog was knitting two stitches through the back loop but when I learned continental, I found out this was really a SSK.

Oops >__>

I know better now, in any case. Heh heh.

When I do ssk, I knit two together through the back loop. No multiple steps or knitting with the left needle (?!?). It is exactly the same as slipping two stitches knitwise etc… you get the same result in the end: a left leaning decrease. It’s way easier than the way English knitters are taught but with less steps and less frustration. I told my English knitting friend this method and she thanks me for it still.

I do have to add that I only knit continental in the round and when I’m doing (say) gusset decreases on a sock, I usually knit the stitches that need to be SSK through the back loop to make them look neater. Why? I tried doing the standard way of SSK and it never looks neat enough to me. I also tried it without knitting the stitches tbl, but it looks only a little neater than the standard SSK.

When knitting flat, I knit tbl by default so my usual SSK is a non-issue for me.
Whew!

Back to my original point: I decided to look up different ways to SSK.

Knitting Help has a few different ways to make a left leaning decrease: http://www.knittinghelp.com/videos/decreases

I learned a new way of doing SSK and realized one of the ways they listed is pretty common in lace patterns and can also be used. They say my way creates a zig-zag, but if you knit the two stitches tbl on the row before (in the round, that is… if knitting flat and you’re not a combo knitter, I suggest purling tbl for those stitches…) it doesn’t look zig zaggy. Alternatively, you can use slip one, knit one, pass slipped stitch over (sl1, k1, psso)… definitely easy to do and looks way better too! I’ve noticed it in a lot of lace patterns I’ve done. Where have you been all my (knitting) life??!?? XD I might start using sl1, k1, psso to replace SSK more often! 😀
Hopefully this post will help someone out. In the end, as long as you make a decrease that slants in the direction you want, it really shouldn’t matter too much. 
I promise not to tell the Knitting Police on you 😉

I’m Spinning Again! :D

Inspired by my dear friend +Beth Reed, I decided to start spinning again.

At first I was going to try using one of my drop spindles. I have both top + bottom whorl spindles, but I quickly got frustrated with them both. I decided to use my Mayan spindle instead.

For those of you who’ve never seen or heard of a Mayan spindle  (I’ve also heard it called a paddle spindle), it’s an interesting looking contraption. It consists of two parts: a blade and a handle. The handle slips in (smirk) a hole in the blade, and you spin the blade around the handle sort of like one of those spinning party favors that make noise. You use the park and draft method to spin fiber.
This is me with the spindle parked between my legs while I draft the fiber. Rawr.

I find it better and easier to use than my drop spindles. I find my yarn is more consistent and even…even after not spinning for over a year! I prefer it over a drop spindle, and am much faster using it. 

My drop spindle yarns tend to be extremely thick and thin… ranging from fingering to bulky. This seems to be between fingering and sport, so not too shabby, if I do say so myself. I’m using some BLF roving I got a couple of years ago in a swap. It’s actually a nice royal purple, but I took these pictures at night, and the flash always washes out purples on my phone -___-
One of these days I’ll post a video of me using my spindle, but I found a similar spindle in action on YouTube:
See? Easy peasy.
If you would like more information, I found the following links to be of much help to me:
http://kero1au.tripod.com/id28.html (this link has a tutorial to make your own!)
I expect to finish spinning the rest of the 4oz roving soon. Pictures of the finished yarn to come! 😀

My Take on Copyright Wank


I’ve been reading about copyright wank on Ravelry a lot lately, and I wanted to weigh in on it.

Here’s my take on selling FOs:

Contrary to popular belief, the designer’s copyright only goes as far as the pattern. Doesn’t matter what kind of disclaimers they may post to the contrary. If I bust my ass making a lace shawl and wanna sell it for $100, there isn’t a damn thing a designer can do about it—whether the pattern is free or paid.

I’m a designer too… I don’t give a shit what people do with the FOs they make from my patterns. Credit would be nice, but at the end of the day if someone feels like making 100 of my crochet nail polishes, sells them all, and never mentions my pattern—more power to them. As long as no one is claiming my pattern is their original creation, IDGAF what you do with YOUR finished object. Go crazy 😛

Designers that get all defensive about this issue confuse the shit out of me.

Aren’t you happy people are using your patterns? If you’re so concerned about people selling their FOs, why did you bother to release the pattern to the general public? If I made some (say…) super duper awesome mittens and I was afraid of people making a profit off of it I would keep it to myself.

Plain and simple.

Most designers don’t have the time to mass produce or sell one-by-one the objects they make themselves, so why should it matter if someone takes their own time to do it? It boggles the mind, it does.

Now, I understand if someone mass produced a designer’s pattern and claimed it was their original work—that would piss me off too and would probably be more of a legal issue then. But again, once you release your pattern out in the world, beyond your basic copyright protections, you don’t have much recourse.

According to Wikipedia, copyright law grants the copyright owner a number of exclusive rights with respect to a copyrighted work:

  • to produce copies or reproductions of the work and to sell those copies (including, typically, electronic copies) 
  • to import or export the work 
  • to create derivative works (works that adapt the original work) 
  • to perform or display the work publicly 
  • to sell or assign these rights to others 
  • to transmit or display by radio or video. 

Notice there is nothing about items made from instructions or anything else pertaining to our topic. It makes me laugh whenever I see a “copyright” notice that says “only for personal or gift use”. Fuck that! I know my rights.

From Knitting Daily’s Copyright 101 For Knitters (all emphasis mine):

In the United States, copyright protections do not extend to the utilitarian aspects of “useful articles,” such as clothing or other functional items. This means that only the artful authorship that can be identified separately from the functional aspects of such articles may be copyrightable: the specific ornamentation, for example, on a dress, sweater, or quilt, and not design constrained by the item’s function as a dress, sweater, or quilt. In general, designs for items that have any intrinsic utilitarian aspects are very difficult to copyright, and copyright infringement claims over similar-looking or even clearly derivative works are not likely to succeed. Be aware, however, that original artwork incorporated into useful articles may be protected, and it may be infringing to reproduce that original artwork for commercial purposes.

You can download a free copy of this eBook here.

Funny how Interweave rushed in after this passage to say they ask you to respect their intended usage blah blah they put in their publications. Notice they’re asking you to respect it, not giving any sort of demand or threatening you if you don’t choose to respect their heed.

Knitty had this to say (emphasis mine again):

When you follow a knitting pattern, you’re reproducing the knitted item. Well, obviously, that’s what you’re meant to do. The question is, did the owner of copyright in the knitted widget [and this presupposes that copyright protects the widget] mean for you to make widgets for sale, or just for yourself and for others as gifts?

It’s not always easy to determine the intention of the designer. Some designers, when they sell a pattern, make it pretty clear that their designs may not be knitted for resale.

Tell me… if I just finished making an item from a pattern and decide to sell it, how am I reselling the item? I am not selling the pattern, but the output of my sweat and hours of hard work. SO what the hell, Knitty???

Maybe Merriam-Webster can help me out here….

Definition of RESALE

1: the act of selling again usually to a new party

2 a: a secondhand sale

b: an additional sale to the same buyer

Hmm, so selling a FO does NOT qualify as a resale; who knew?
/sarcasm

Both Interweave and Knitty (no doubt) have designers howling after them to say these things in designers’ favor. After all, it’s their priority to keep designers happy so they can keep putting out stuff in their publications. At least Interweave had the balls (har har) to tell the truth and ask nicely if the patterns can be used as they asked.

So what can you take away from the culmination of my few hours of reading and research? (TL;DR Version)

  1. That you can make and sell items from patterns without fear of legal retaliation and not only that… 
  2. Selling FOs are perfectly legal. 
  3. When a designer says that you cannot make stuff to resell, you can safely say that you’re not… even if you make 1000 and sell them to a store. Applying such a stipulation to items that don’t exist at the time you get/purchase a pattern is ludicrous. 
  4. Designers who post such notices are ridiculous and are outside of their copyright protections. 
  5. If you decide to sell items from a pattern, don’t claim you made the actual pattern. It’s not cool and it’s bad karma. 
  6. If you make a pattern so super duper awesome and don’t want its’ FOs sold, don’t publish it. 

Did I miss anything? I might have… I’m tired 😛 

Also, please note that all the legal mumbo jumbo I quoted in this post applies to US Copyright laws; if you’re outside of the US, YMMV.

Naughty, Naughty Me (An Update of Sorts)

Jeeeeez, it’s been exactly two months since my last post!

And what excuse do I have?? NONE.

I’m unemployed atm, and have had nothing but time. But time is a tricky mistress. When you think you have more than enough… You don’t.

I’ve done soooo much since my last crafty post. Which was in April XD

I suck, I knowwww D:

First, let’s revisit my Knitolutions, shall we?

Knitolutions 2012

  • Knit at least one lace shawl – I made TWO!
  • Knit a project with beads  – Check!
  • Learn how to read lace knitting charts – Check!
  • Do more advanced Colorwork – still working on those mittens from October LOL
  • Make at least one sweater this year – I am almost done with one, and going to finish up another one that had been luring around since last year….
  • Make at least 6 pairs of socks – two down, working on another pair right now…
  • Use up my worsted/chunky yarn stash – hasn’t happened yet. I have been working on my fingering wt. stash though… 😛
  • Finish at least two projects a month, or 24 total for the year – Finished 19 projects so far! Yayyy 😀
  • Replace inferior accouterments with better ones – well….not having a job puts a damper on this one. I need a new ball winder, yarn swift, and I want a set of Knitter’s Pride 16″ interchangeables. *le sigh*
  • Crochet more -check! I have crocheted more so far this year than I did last year… amigurumi not included lol
  • Make an Afghan or blanket with all the crappy red heart I still guiltily hoard. – I’m still working on my blanket. I decided to just finish up the colors I started and be done with it. Ugh.
In other news, I have also been on a baby knit kick! I have a nephew due in October, and I have been making things for him. 

Tell me these aren’t the cutest lil socks you ever seen??!?? 😀

I thought I would make the critter something with colorwork 😛

I am also working on a blanket, this pattern to be specific. I will show you my progress to date, but I won’t say anymore about this shitty ass waste of my life blood pattern. I plan on making a whole post about it when I finish it this week.

Progress… was slow and steady, now erratic and frantic as FUCK. It’s to be done by Friday 8/24 D:

So yeah. I have a shitton of progress to report, but I don’t want this post to become more epic than it already is, so later this week I’ll share more of what I was doing instead of blogging I’ve been working on in the past few months *ahem*, or you can check out my FOs on Ravelry if you have an account and just cannot wait 😛

I have a bunch of all new YRSTS’s in store for you (yes, I haven;t forgotten about it! I have been keeping tabs on offensive patterns lol), as well as some super especial crochet-centric posts coming up soon! I’ll make more of an effort to post more, I promise!! 😛